NUTS AND VOLTS

Posted in: Nuts and Volts

Texas Instruments unveils the Stellaris® LaunchPad

September 2012

Expanding its innovative LaunchPad portfolio to the ARM ecosystem, Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) today announced a new low-price, easy-to-use Stellaris® LM4F120 LaunchPad evaluation kit. The tool allows professional engineers, hobbyists and university students to begin exploring ARM Cortex-M4F microcontrollers and TI's Stellaris family of microcontrollers for under $5 USD!

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Features and benefits of the Stellaris LM4F120 LaunchPad evaluation kit:

  •     Includes a 32-bit LM4F120H5QR Cortex-M4 MCU with floating point operating up to 80 MHz that provides targeted performance headroom for application differentiation, 64 KB flash with 100,000 write/erase cycles and two 12-bit 1MSPS ADCs and up to 27 timers, some configurable up to 64-bits.
  •     License- and royalty-free StellarisWare® software pre-loaded in ROM to conserve Flash memory; software eases design and allows developers to speed time to market.
  •     Incorporates USB connectivity and other peripherals including serial ports for UART, I2C, SSI/SPI and CAN controllers so developers can support the communication standard best suited for their application.
  •     Out-of-the-box RGB LED example application lets developers start experimenting with the Stellaris LaunchPad in minutes.
  •     Compatible with several existing MSP430 and C2000 MCU BoosterPacks so developers can now quickly and easily evaluate functionality across TI's broad portfolio of microcontrollers.
  •     Planned BoosterPacks include capabilities for sensors, wireless connectivity and many more third-party BoosterPacks.

 

(Source) Texas Instruments


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