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June 2014

Nuts and Volts Magazine

Make Your Own RF Signal Generator

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Features

MakerPlot — The DIY Software Kit ... Part 9

Learn all about Event Codes, which are the instructions that make every switch, button, and textbox control an Interface so it does what you want it to do.



Projects

A 150 MHz RF Signal Generator for Your Test Bench

No test bench is complete until it has an RF signal source of some type. Here is a sweet general purpose RF signal generator that won’t take up much space and can be built on the cheap.


A Parametric Amplifier

Get into the swing of mechanical resonate oscillators by constructing this simple pendulum.


BASIC Stamp Module Tester

Microcontroller/PIC

This easy-to-build-and-use tester will help you quickly troubleshoot problems like bad I/O pins, issues with RAM, and other headaches you might be having with the Stamps you’re using in projects.



Columns

PICAXE Primer
by Ron Hackett
Construct a Battery-Backed UPS for Your Pi
Protect your Pi during power outages for a fraction of the cost of commercial uninterruptable power supply units.

Open Communication
by Louis E. Frenzel
The Internet of Things and Machine-to-Machine Communications Emerge as Internet Drivers
In case you haven’t heard, the Internet of Things (IoT) and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) are the next big things in Internet growth and new communications applications. Both technologies are expected to enable billions of new devices in the coming years.

Smiley’s Workshop
by Joe Pardue
The Arduino Classroom. Arduino 101/Chapter 6: Analog Input
This time, learn about inputting analog signals using the analog-to-digital converter built into the Arduino, plus some basic electrical concepts to help understand what it is that’s being input.

The Design Cycle
by Fred Eady
The Dawn of a New EVE
This is the first in a series of tutorials aimed at enabling FTDI's new Embedded Video Engine technology using a PIC microcontroller. Along the way, we will use Microchip's XC32 C compiler to code the various elements of our EVE firmware driver. Plus, with the help of a PICkit3, we will exercise this driver onboard a Digilent MX3 which is based on the PIC32MX320F128H.

Departments

Can’t Get There From Here
by Bryan Bergeron
Children and younger adults often have an easier time picking up microcontrollers, relative to someone with years of experience with analog circuits. This is — in part — because they have no legacy knowledge to get in the way