Everything for Electronics

Microcontrollers

The Arduino Graphics Interface — Part 1

Turn an Arduino Due and a leftover analog oscilloscope into a high resolution computer graphics display and gain valuable insights into computer graphics, digital-to-analog conversion (ADC), and advanced Direct Memory Access (DMA) hardware and software techniques.

Build a Custom Weather Gauge — Part 2

This fun, elegant, and useful project pulls data from the Internet so a series of useful displays can show all kinds of cool info in real time from your mantel or bookshelf in this impressive platform.

In our previous article, we discussed the circuit and code for each of the core components for our Weather Gauge. We took a deep dive on how the stepper is wired up and the node.js code that drives it. Now, it’s time to put it all together and light it up in this final installment.

Build a Custom Weather Gauge — Part 1

This fun, elegant, and useful project pulls data from the Internet so a series of useful displays can show all kinds of cool info in real time from your mantel or bookshelf in this impressive platform.

In this first article of a two-part series, we’ll discuss the circuit and code for each of the core components for the weather; take a deep dive on how the stepper is wired up; then learn about the node.js code that drives it.

Arduino PID Temperature Control

The “magic” of Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) process control can be mystifying. In this article, we’ll step you through using an Arduino in a hands-on exercise using a solid-state relay to control a 1,500 watt hotplate in a real world solution to a tricky problem: automating a vegetable canning process.

Working with I2C Sensor Devices

Here’s a quick beginner-friendly tutorial that shows you how to interface and read data with the popular serial protocol, I2C. In particular, we’ll be reading data from the NXP MPL3115A2 altimeter/barometer/temperature sensor. The principles found here can also be applied generically, even to your ambifacient lunar wane shaft positioning sensor of your turboencabulator.

Replacing The 555 With A PIC — Part 2 — A Digital Analog

Inspired by Forrest Mims and his Mini-Notebook series, we are detailing the emulation of a 555 or 556 using a PIC in several different circuits in our own set of articles. In this installment, we’ll review the specific circuits which use the 555 as a simple one-shot and discuss the PIC replacement for the same applications.

The Retro PIC Single-Board Computer

Over the years, I have accumulated a bunch of chips from before the era of true PCs when computers with names like Altair, KIM-1, and Cosmac ELF were popular. I’ve been looking for a way to use them in new projects, so I designed a system around a 40-pin PIC16F887. I figured this would put some of my historic chips to work and be a great learning tool for understanding how a microcomputer works.

Replacing The 555 With A PIC — Part 1 — A Digital Analog

Inspired by Forrest Mims and his Mini-Notebook series, we'll detail the emulation of a 555 or 556 using a PIC in several different circuits. The particular implementation this time covers both monostable and astable modes, and the PIC does not have to be reprogrammed in any way.

Build the Numitron — A Six-Digit Clock

This six-digit, beautifully designed timepiece showcases cold war era components — Numitrons instead of Nixie tubes — along with modern LEDs and a Microchip PIC to create not only a useful clock but a great conversation piece as well.

ESP8266 NTP Clock

Building digital clocks may not be the sexiest of DIY projects, but it’s still pretty fun. Try this version that utilizes the ESP8266 family of devices which makes incorporating the Network Time Protocol simple.